News

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Several workers compensation bills read for the first time in the California legislature on Monday would expand presumptive illness and injury protections to more workers and protect employees from discrimination in disability determinations.

S.B. 567, introduced by Sen. Anna Caballero, D-Salinas, and Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, would extend the injury and illness presumption currently provided to first responders in the state to include registered nurses who provide direct patient care in an acute care setting.

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

SACRAMENTO, CA) – Assemblymember Sydney Kamlager-Dove (D-Los Angeles) introduced Assembly Constitutional Amendment 6 (ACA 6), known as the Free the Vote Act, which would allow people on parole to vote. Currently, approximately 46,000 Californians who have been released from prison are not allowed to vote in local, state or federal elections.

“Parolees are our family members, our neighbors and our colleagues. They have been released from prison because they are no longer considered threats to society, but they are considered too dangerous to vote?  That is absurd!” Kamlager-Dove said in a news conference outside the State Capitol.

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

SACRAMENTO, CA) – Assemblymember Sydney Kamlager-Dove (D-Los Angeles) introduced Assembly Constitutional Amendment 6 (ACA 6), known as the Free the Vote Act, which would allow people on parole to vote. Currently, approximately 46,000 Californians who have been released from prison are not allowed to vote in local, state or federal elections.

“Parolees are our family members, our neighbors and our colleagues. They have been released from prison because they are no longer considered threats to society, but they are considered too dangerous to vote?  That is absurd!” Kamlager-Dove said in a news conference outside the State Capitol.

Thursday, February 7, 2019

The biggest show of all at President Trump’s second State of the Union address was neither the speech itself nor the honored guests but the massive and indomitable sea of white. Of the 102 women serving in the House of Representatives, 89 of them are Democrats, most of whom wore white.  And when so many women are wearing white after Labor Day, we can’t help but notice.

White was the chosen color of the 19th-century suffragettes who knew that in order to be noticed, they first had to be seen. Since then, women in politics have often chosen to wear white as a way of paying homage to those who paved their way. Along with white, the American suffragette attire included purple, in solidarity with the suffragettes in Britain, and gold to represent the sunflower, the state flower of Kansas, which was one of the earliest states to consider granting women the right to vote.

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Child care providers have clearly taken note of Gov. Gavin Newsom’s plans to support early childhood initiatives. A group of 200 workers, advocates and family members are heading to the Capitol this morning in efforts to form a union and rally behind the Building a Better Early Care and Education System Act that Assemblywoman Monique Limón, D-Goleta, plans to introduce.

Providers say that programs are too expensive and that outdated laws discriminate against women of color who make up a significant portion of the workforce, yet often struggle in poverty themselves. Limón’s bill would push for better wages and benefits and expand access to care.

Monday, January 28, 2019

SACRAMENTO (CBS13/AP) – Reality TV star Kim Kardashian West was in Sacramento on Monday to advocate from criminal justice reform.

Kardashian West’s visit coincided with the “Free the Vote” campaign push to allow parolees to vote.

The proposal – introduced on Monday by Assemblymembers Kevin McCarty, Lorena Gonzalez, Sydney Kamlager-Dove and Rob Bonta – would restore the voting rights of people who have served their time and are now on parole.

Monday, January 28, 2019

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Tens of thousands of parolees would be allowed to vote under a state constitutional amendment proposed Monday by California's secretary of state and Democratic lawmakers who called it the next civil rights issue.

The proposal intended for the 2020 ballot would help nearly 50,000 felons who have served their time adjust to being back in the community, said California Secretary of State Alex Padilla and other advocates. Parolees currently are prohibited from registering to vote in local, state or federal elections.