News

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

A bill to halt plans in dozens of California cities to tax streaming video services for five years is stalled for the year.

Assemblyman Sebastian Ridley-Thomas (D) agreed to shift his A.B. 252 into an idea that lawmakers will study this year and take up again in 2018. The unanimous vote April 24 in the Assembly Revenue and Taxation Committee was a win for the powerful California Cable and Telecommunications Association, as well as cities, counties and the consulting firm MuniServices LLC, which has been helping cities figure out if their existing ordinances would allow such a tax.

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Huffington Post
Sebastian Ridley-Thomas

If states remain the laboratories of democracy, let the State of California model fiscally responsible governance with a commitment to respecting the policy concerns of Californians. Substantial chatter on the left coast since November 8th of last year has focused on the deep concerns felt about new leadership in Washington, D.C. and a country with seemingly divergent views on the future of the Union.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

CULVER CITY, Calif. (KGO) --

Netflix and other streaming video services could end up being taxed, but a state assemblyman has a bill that will stop that.

The bill would prevent utility taxes on streaming media companies for the next five years.

Friday, February 3, 2017

Multiple California cities began exploring whether to tax consumers for watching Netflix and other streaming video services last year, and now a Los Angeles lawmaker wants to ban the idea.

Assemblyman Sebastian Ridley-Thomas, a Democrat, has introduced Assembly Bill 252, which would prohibit cities from implementing so-called “Netflix taxes.” Pasadena and other cities have been weighing whether to extend existing taxes on cable-television subscribers to those who used video-streaming services.

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Gov. Jerry Brown predicted last fall that new legislation and administrative actions essential to preserving the state's ambitious climate strategy would give him leverage to negotiate a cap-and-trade extension.

"They're going to get commands to do things," Brown said, directing his remarks at the state's powerful business interests, "and they're going to plead for a market system called cap and trade so they can respond in a way that's more beneficial to their bottom line."

Now, the Democratic governor is urging lawmakers to renew the cap-and-trade program amid signs his forecast was prophetic. Soon after Brown released his proposal this month, the Western States Petroleum Association indicated that the oil industry prefers the flexibility of a market mechanism to more burdensome policies also being contemplated to reduce greenhouse gases.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

California legislative leaders announced they will defend the state’s diversity, science and economic accomplishments after Donald Trump’s presidential election victory.

Senate President pro Tempore Kevin de Leon and Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon called California a refuge of justice and opportunity for all people and an example for other states to follow.

Monday, January 16, 2017

More than 200,000 people were expected to line Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Monday for the Kingdom Day Parade in honor of the civil rights leader.

Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Los Angeles, served as grand marshal for the 32nd annual Kingdom Day Parade. Waters' House colleagues were set to join her in the parade include Reps. Karen Bass, D-Los Angeles, and Nanette Barragan, D-San Pedro, according to organizers.